I Want People To Know That I Can Make It Without Don Jazzy – Wande Coal

On the heels of his trending sophomore album, Wanted, singer Wande Coal has opened up on a few salient issues.

“I was with Mohits and the company dissolved in 2011, then I was left alone to choose where to go – either to go with Dbanj or Don Jazzy,” he began in an exclusive interview with Vanguard.

He said this in response to why it took as much as six years to drop a second album.

Speaking further he said he made move to join Jazzy not because he didn’t have a smooth relationship with Dbanj or anything of such but because as a singer he needed the services of a producer and he had already bonded with Jazzy.

He also said the arrangement with Don Jazzy was such that there was no contract given they both had a relationship founded on trust.

“I just moved with Don  Jazzy  because we  had bonded, It’s not that I didn’t like Dbanj but I just had to move with Don Jazzy because he is a producer and I am a singer. I moved with Don Jazzy without no contract . It was based on love and I had no contract. At some point I wanted to be in charge of my own creativity and have my own personal growth .I have been working with Don Jazzy for a while and I wanted to give other people the opportunity to produce my music. It takes time. I left Don Jazzy in 2013 and we were already working on my second album, which was almost done. But at the end of the day with business, you disagree and agree. It just didn’t work out .That is why I had to start all over again .Songs like Rotate are no longer on the album. I had to start all over again creating new songs, getting a new producer that is why it took this long,” he said.

He however acknowledged that nothing good comes easily, stating that the journey of having to rework his style of music has been tasking especially with people concluding that his ‘career [had] declined’.

A lot of people said my career has declined. All these things motivate me. I like good criticisms. I met Don Jazzy in 2006; they didn’t sign me until 2010. I have been working all that time, writing songs. It wasn’t too hard, but I just needed sometime to create my own sound. New producers are coming up and I decided to give them a chance. The song I did in Ghana with R2bees became a hit, but it wasn’t Don Jazzy that produced it. Don Jazzy doesn’t have a problem with that. People like Wizkid and Davido, I practically influenced them, telling them this is how to go about it. People must grow, table must turn, and people must change. I don’t want to be stereotyped with my sound. I don’t want people to feel that if I don’t have Don Jazzy, I cannot make it.”

The afro pop singer also said the new album, Wanted, will be everybody’s favourite as he touched on a lot of demographics with his creativity.

“My last album covers songs for mamas, papas and young people. This album is just my own creativity and personal growth from over the years. I think it’s a must-get album. I spoke about different things. I spoke in my dialect, I spoke in pidgin, I spoke in English. I focused on different topics for each song in the album,” he said.

On titling the album Wanted the singer said: “Everywhere I go people ask me for the album in spite of the fact that I have released a couple of singles. Even my mum asked for the album. She wants to listen to songs that will motivate her and motivate her friends. So I just got the title Wanted just like that.”

The singer also touched on his Mushin roots saying he gets to visit the community from time to time.

On whether or not he misses Don Jazzy’s inputs in his current music process, he said: “There are no two ways about it, I miss Don Jazzy. When we are in the studio we make ourselves laugh that is what people hardly know. Hopefully, we can work together sometime in the future. There is no beef.”

Wande Coal is a Nigerian artiste famed for his wave-making first album, Mushin To MoHits.

The single father of one is a graduate of Curriculum Studies from the University of Lagos.

Following the dissolution of MoHits record label in 2012 he stayed back with Don Jazzy under the Mavins imprint but left to run his Black Diamond label after series of irreconcilable differences in 2013. The misunderstanding with label honcho Don Jazzy remains a major period in the singer’s career given the social media spat over the song Baby Face and the media furore in the wake of it.